Stress Statistics

Within my latest project proposal I planned to research into who stress affects the most, to define the target audience for my game. Below is that research.

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My own thoughts

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  • But it seems that parents, younger generations and those living in lower-income households (making less than $50,000 per year) have a different experience — they report higher levels of stress than Americans overall
  • those who have particularly high stress about money are more likely to say they engage in unhealthy behaviors to manage their stress
  • Research also shows that financial struggles strain individuals’ cognitive abilities, which could lead to poor decision-making

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  • (72 percent) of adults report feeling stressed about money at least some of the time – Clear stress is a large issue within society and something useful to spread awareness of.
  • 22 percent rate their stress about money during the past month as an 8, 9 or 10 on a 10-point scale)

 

picture4Stress is higher within lower income households (recently) – Makes it clear money is a large factor within the cause of stress and something to consider when designing my game. 

  • Adults in lower-income households are twice as likely as those in higher-income households to say they feel stress about money all or most of the time (36 percent vs. 18 percent)
  • Thirty percent of adults in lower-income households report that at the end of the month, they don’t have enough money to make ends meet
  • More people with lower reported income say that they have felt a sense of loneliness and isolation in the past month due to stress (29 percent vs. 21 percent of people with higher reported income).- Isolation is an affect of stress

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  • Overall, younger generations and parents rate their stress higher than Americans overall – 2 possible target audiences
  • Parents say their overall stress is a 5.7 on a 10-point scale
  • Parents also report higher levels of stress about money compared to non-parents (5.8 vs. 4.4 on a 10-point scale).15
  • Millennials and Gen Xers report comparable levels of overall stress — 5.5 and 5.4
  • more than onequarter say their overall stress has increased in the past year (36 percent of Millennials and 30 percent of Gen Xers).
  • Money is a somewhat or very significant source of stress for the majority of Americans (64 percent) but even more so for parents (77 percent), Millennials (75 percent) and Gen Xers (76 percent). – Again helping to back up the idea that money is a high causer of stress and something to greatly consider in my designs. 
  • More than half of parents (58 percent) and Millennials (57 percent) say that paying for essentials is a somewhat or very significant source of stress, compared with 44 percent of Americans overall reporting the same. – Not being able to afford certain items causes stress 

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  • Nearly half (45 percent) of parents, 43 percent of Millennials and 41 percent of Gen Xers say that their financial situation or lack of money prevents them from living a healthy lifestyle, compared to 32 percent of all Americans saying the same.
  • Parents who say their stress about money is extreme are nearly three times as likely as parents with low stress about money to rate their health as fair or poor (27 percent vs. 10 percent).
  • Millennials who say their stress about money is extreme are more likely than Millennials who report low stress about money to say they engage in sedentary or unhealthy behaviors to manage their stress, such as watching television/ movies for more than two hours per day (58 percent vs. 35 percent), surfing the Internet (67 percent vs. 35 percent), napping/sleeping (46 percent vs. 24 percent), eating (41 percent vs. 19 percent), drinking alcohol (25 percent vs. 9 percent) or smoking (21 percent vs. 3 percent).
  • Nearly half of women (49 percent) say that paying for essentials is a somewhat or very significant source of stress, compared with 38 percent of men.

Millennials are more likely to manage stress in bad ways – Can I change this behaviour through a game? 

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Surfing the internet and watching the tv are bad stress managements – Could playing a useful serious game be a better option? 

  • Survey findings show that Americans who say they have emotional support — specifically, that they have someone they can ask for emotional support if they need it, such as family and friends — report lower stress levels and better related outcomes than those without emotional support
  • One in five Americans (21 percent) say they have no one to rely on for emotional support
  • The average overall stress level for those who say they have no emotional support is 6.2 on a 10-point scale, compared with 4.8 for those who say they have emotional support

A game which encourages social support could be useful in lowering the stress levels of people – multiplayer games?

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  • Roughly one-quarter of parents (26 percent) and Millennials (25 percent) say that they do not have emotional support.
  • Twenty-eight percent of parents and 34 percent of Millennials report feeling a sense of loneliness/isolation due to stress in the past month, compared with 24 percent of Americans overall.
  • 62 percent of parents and 59 percent of Millennials say they could have used a lot, some or a little more emotional support in the past year than they received).
  • 14 percent — say they could have used a lot more emotional support in the past year.

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Graph shows that the mean stress level is still far higher than the mean healthy stress level. Showing me that though stress has lowered over the years, it is still a grave issue within the world, and something that would be useful to focus on solving. 

  • , reported stress levels remain higher than what Americans believe to be healthy — 3.7
  • Forty-two percent of adults say they are not doing enough or are not sure whether they are doing enough to manage their stress. One in five Americans (20 percent) say they never engage in an activity to help relieve or manage their stress.

 

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From the symptoms of stress it’s clear to see that majority of the symptoms are all similarly likely, due the to percentage range being very small. Making me realise that if I wanted to focus on any of the symptoms and try to cure this, then any of them would be suitable choices. 

  • 75 percent of Americans report experiencing at least one symptom of stress in the past month.
  • more than one in 10 say that they are too stressed to make a desired change
  • Stress appears to affect relationships as well — 41 percent of adults who are married or living with a partner say that they lost patience or yelled at their spouse or partner due to stress in the past month

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From the graph I can clearly see that women have higher stress levels and could be seen to be affected by stress more than men. Making me think that I should focus on women for my target audience. 

  • More women than men say that their stress has increased in the past year (32 percent vs. 25 percent).
  • Women are more likely than men to report money (68 percent vs. 61 percent) and family responsibilities (55 percent vs. 39 percent) as very or somewhat significant sources of stress.
  • Women are also more likely than men to say their eating habits are affected by stress. Forty-one percent say they have eaten too much/eaten unhealthy foods because of stress in the past month, compared with 24 percent of men, and 30 percent say they have skipped a meal because of stress in the past month, compared with 20 percent of men.

 

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The graphs makes it appear as though millennials have the highest stress level than other adult age group. Telling me that this is the generation that is most in need of help when it comes to stress compared to the other age groups. – Reason to choose them for the target audience of the game

  • Millennials are the most likely of all generations to say their stress has increased in the past year (36 percent vs. 30 percent of Gen Xers, 24 percent of Boomers and 19 percent of Matures)
  • More than four-fifths of Millennials (82 percent) (such a large amount) say they have experienced at least one symptom of stress in the past month (compared with 79 percent of Gen Xers, 70 percent of Boomers and 62 percent of Matures).
  • Millennials are more likely than other generations to say that stress has a very strong or strong impact on their physical (30 percent vs. 27 percent of Gen Xers, 25 percent of Boomers and 12 percent of Matures) and mental health (37 percent vs. 33 percent of Gen Xers, 23 percent of Boomers and 11 percent of Matures).
  • More than half of Millennials say they have lain awake at night in the past month due to stress (51 percent
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• (millennials)Forty-one percent say they have eaten too much/eaten unhealthy foods because of stress in the past month

  • (millennials) Thirty-four percent say they have skipped a meal because of stress in the past month

Connection between stress and eating disorders – Possible area to look into? 

  • Nearly half of parents (49 percent) say they lost patience with their children in the past month when they were feeling stressed.

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Thoughts

From the research it is clear that a millennial female who is a parent is the most likely to suffer from stress, with money and family responsibilities being the greatest causes.

Is this a too specific group? Do they play games? If they’re a parent do they have time to play games?

Millennials may be more of an appropriate audience, though could be too large of a range to focus on, as they’re an age group between 19-35, which is a diverse set of people and different types of games will appeal to the different ages.

To reduce the audience back down to a more manageable size, I could simply focus on female millennials and not necessarily ones with children. As females are more stressed on average than males and millennials are more stressed than other groups, so the combination of the two makes for some very stressed people.

 

Plan

I plan to research into what games appeal to female millenials, to see if the ideas I have created so far would appeal to them and if not why.

 

  • What types of games to females play? – causal, strategy, etc
  • What characters do you enjoy playing?
  • Do they enjoy social or individual games?
  • What platforms are popular with this audience?